Dr. John Farrelly

Top 5 things you should now about radiation therapy for your pet.

Finding out that your pet has cancer can often be a traumatic experience.  Most people have questions such as, “What can be done for my pets tumor?” or “Will treating my pets cancer cause a lot of pain and discomfort?”  In order to get the best possible treatment for your pet and for you, it is important to get as much good information as possible.  When it comes to radiation therapy for pets, many pet owners do not even know that radiation therapy is available.  In honor of May being Pet Cancer Awareness Month and in an effort to provide pet owners with as much information as possible we c

Top 5 things you should now about radiation therapy for your pet.

For many veterinarians giving a pet owner a diagnosis of cancer can be difficult.  After building up a relationship over years with well visits, preventative care and non-cancerous issues, pet owners can often become very distraught upon hearing the word “cancer.”  These caring owners will often have many questions about cancer treatment including questions about potential treatment options, survival times, side effects and quality of life.  Radiation therapy has been coming more and more available in the United States to treat cancer in pets, but, many pet owners do not even know that radi

Hot off the Presses - New Study Shines Light On Radiation for Nasal Sarcomas

A new study published in the March/April edition of Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound provides some very useful information about treating nasal sarcomas in dogs.  This study was entitled Survival Times for Canine Intranasal Sarcomas Treated with Radiation Therapy: 86 Cases (1996-2011), Sones et.al. Vet Radiol Ultrasound.  Nasal sarcomas comprise approximately 1/3 of nasal tumors in dogs and although previous papers have shown longer survival times for sarcomas, the number of patients treated in those papers has been limited.

New Study Shines Light On Radiation for Nasal Sarcomas

A new retrospective study published in the March/April edition of Veterinary Radiology and Ultrasound provides some very useful information regarding the treatment of nasal sarcomas in dogs.  The study was entitled Survival Times for Canine Intranasal Sarcomas Treated with Radiation Therapy: 86 Cases (1996-2011), Sones et.al. Vet Radiol Ultrasound.  Nasal sarcomas comprise approximately 1/3 of nasal tumors in dogs.  However, even though previous papers have shown longer survival times for sarcomas, the number of patients treated in those papers has been limited.

New technology for the treatment of nasal tumors in dogs and cats

Nasal tumors are one of the most challenging tumors to treat in dogs and cats.  These tumors usually fill up one or both sides of the entire nasal cavity and sinuses.  In the skull of a dog or cat, this means that the tumor often wraps around the eyes and the brain and it usually lies just above the palate.  Therefore, when treating these patients with radiation therapy in the past, we typically needed to include a great deal of the oral mucosa, the eyes and the brain.  In most dogs, treating these areas with a definitive dose of radiation usually results in moderate to severe short-term si

Channel 12 Pet Talk - featuring Dr. Gerald Post, Carol Ferrucci and Bear

Pet Talk - featuring Dr. Gerald Post, Carol Ferrucci and Bear a long-term cancer survivor. Bear has been a Veterinary Cancer Center patient since May 2010. Watch his amazing story!

Norwalk Hour Articles

I am Gerald Post, a board certified veterinary oncologist, owner of the Veterinary Oncology and Hematology Center in Norwalk, which has been serving Fairfield County pets and their people for 12 years, and this is the first of a regular column about pets and cancer.

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